City Schools Division of Antipolo

"Edukasyong Tapat at Sapat, Dapat Para sa Lahat"

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Antipolo City is located in the northern half of Rizal Province but rather close to its meridional center. The Poblacion is approximately 29 kilometers from Manila. In terms of size, it is the second largest municipality in the province with a total land area of 38,504.44 hectares representing 29.4% of the entire land area of Rizal.  Currently, it is subdivided into two (2) legislative districts with eight (8) barangays each.

District I     District II  
Bagong Nayon Mayamot   Calawis San Jose
Beverly Hills Muntindilaw   Cupang San Juan
Dela Paz San Isidro   Dalig San Luis
Mambugan Sta.Cruz   Inarawan San Roque

For the past years, Antipolo evolved into a dynamic and economically progressive town and continues to grow rapidly and is one of the most prosperous towns of the province of Rizal.

 

BACKGROUND

On February 13, 1998, then President Fidel V. Ramos signed into law Republic Act 8508, making the Municipality of Antipolo into a component city of the Province of Rizal.  A plebiscite held on April 4, 1998 ratified the bill thus acquired its corporate existence as the City of Antipolo.

 

The school districts of Antipolo, Antipolo I and Teresa-Antipolo II remained under the supervision of the Division of Rizal until, by virtue of a Memorandum, the City Schools Division of Antipolo became completely independent from the Division of Rizal on February 3, 2003 with Dr. Aurea F. Sto. Domingo as its Officer-In-Charge.

 

It was during the incumbency of then Secretary Edilberto C. de Jesus when, Dr. Paraluman R. Giron, the Director IV of Region IV Southern Tagalog, transmitted the “go-signal” letter to Dr. Edith A. Doblada, Superintendent of the Division of Rizal, and on the morning of Monday, February 3, 2003, 8:00 o’clock to be exact, the New Division, the Division of Antipolo City was born.

 

A group of Rizal education officials was sent-off to their new workplace and shared temporary shelter in the office of Dr. Norma L. Maalindog, Principal II of San Isidro Elementary School.  For six month, February to July 2003, San Isidro Elementary School had been the seat of office and a home to Division Officials. The Garcia Type 1991 School Building of San Isidro ES is now the official seat of office of the Division of Antipolo City.

 

VISION

We dream of Filipinos

who passionately love their country

and whose values and competencies

enable them to realize their full potential

and contribute meaningfully to building the nation.

As learner-centered public institution,

the Department of Education

continuously improves itself

to better serve its stakeholders.

icon_vision

MISSION

To protect the right of every Filipino to quality, equitable,

culture-based, and complete basic education where:

Students learn in a child-friendly, gender-sensitive, safe, and motivating environment

Teachers facilitate learning and constantly nurture every learner

Administrators and staff, as stewards of the institution, ensure an enabling and supportive environment for effective learning to happen

Family, community, and other stakeholders are actively engaged and share responsibility for developing life-long learners

mission1

CORE VALUES

Culture of Excellence

Integrity and Accountability

Maka-Diyos

Maka-tao

Makakalikasan

Makabansa

Our-values-icons-value

 11951937_1130758450285952_1582060859917092393_n

sds  To ensure access to, promote equity in, and continuously improve the quality of basic education in the schools division under her care by leading in the development and implementation of the division’s education development plans (DEDP), programs, and standards (consistent with the national educational policies, plans and standards), building partnerships and networking with stakeholders of education, as well as by effectively and efficiently managing the financial, human and physical resources of the schools division.
 To ensure full implementation of the articulated basic education curriculum (pre-school, elementary, secondary & ALS), through localization/indigenization and innovations in teaching the various subject areas towards improvement in the quality of learning outcomes.

sgod

Primarily accountable for the implementation of standards and policies relevant to managing schools and to ensure that the following are provided to/ implemented in schools for the purpose of effectiveness:

    • Quality Management System Implementation
    • Assessment
    • Technical Assistance

 

 

 

DIVISION EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Situational Analysis, Targets and Strategies

 I.   Introduction

 

The DIVISION OF ANTIPOLO CITY on its 10th year of serving the very recipients of the community continuously commits itself to develop all learners leading to the actualization of their potentials to make them self-reliant and productive citizens of the society.

 

In line with DepEd Vision of K-to-12 to produce Filipino graduates who are holistically-developed with 21st century skills prepared for higher education, middle-level skills development, employment, and entrepreneurship, the Division envisions itself to be “A value-laden performing Division with competent personnel, supportive stakeholders, and holistic lifelong learners equipped with 21st century skills”.

 

We are committed to our Mission “To provide quality basic education for the holistic development of lifelong learners equipped with 21st century skills, and appreciation and recognition of various stakeholders” in line with DepEd Mission “To provide quality basic education that is accessible to all, and lays the foundation of lifelong learning and service for the common good.”

 

For the past year, significant accomplishments have been realized in keeping learners in school and improving the holding power of the Division. However, expanding access and participation in education and in raising achievement levels show an alarming stagnancy which could cause a setback in the drive towards excellence in education. The magnitude of the problem warrants extraordinary educational development efforts to promote inclusion of all children in the educational system and improve academic performance.

 

 

 

II.   Division Situational Analysis

 

A.  External Analysis. There are several factors that affect education outcomes which need to be examined to determine the extent of how it changes the trend or direction that the Division is trying to aim. An extensive look of how these factors poses opportunities or threats are explained in this section.

 

Social Factors These include aspects referring to the characteristics of learners, their families and their community that influences the educational system.

 

Social Factors

Data

Opportunities

Threats

Population 6.86% average annual increase with 80% of the increase due to net migration(Source: CPDO) Greater chance to hire more competent teachers and personnel Greater needs for educational resources to address gaps
Health 9.82% (elem) and 11.41% (sec) are undernourished(Source: DHNU) Strong linkages with NGOs and LGUs that provide health services 8.83% (elem) and 9.13% (sec) who are undernourished are struggling learners15.7% of total dropouts are due to illness, hunger or malnutrition
Culture 1% of the population are Dumagats(Source: CPDO) Needs of Dumagat communities are given attention to by LGU and DepEd Limited resources to sustain cultural identity
Community 43 POs, NGOs and CSOs provide assistance to schools(Source: PIO) Strong partnership by stakeholders with the schools Lack of coordination with the Division

 

 

Political Factors These include aspects related to government policies and administrative practices that influence the operation of schools and the division in the delivery of basic education services.

 

Political Factors

Data

Opportunities

Threats

Utilization of Special Education Fund (SEF) SEF for 2012 is Php 251,290,856(Source: LSB) LSB approves PAPs as determined by DepEd that leads to better delivery of services Allocation or Utilization of SEF may be affected by political interventions
Policies of city government in support to education Resolutions issued on selling cigarettes and liquors to students, and preventing students in computer shops during school hours(Source: Public Information Office)    Local government provides legal bases to keep students away from distractions Strict compliance needs to be monitored
Armed conflicts 9 schools are in armed conflict areas(Source: Army SAF) Strong linkage with Army SAF to provide security assistance Safety and security of 2,247 students (1.68%) and 86 personnel are at stakeClasses are suspended on the average 5 days in a school year

 

 

Ecological Factor These include aspects related to the environment and the physical characteristics of the city that affect the provision of access, efficiency and quality of learners.

 

Ecological  Factors

Data

Opportunities

Threats

Disaster Risk 5 schools are in landslide-prone areas5 schools are in flood-prone areas(Source: CDRRMO) LGUs are in close coordination with DepEd in disaster risk management Classes are suspended on the average 12 days in a school year
Watershed Areas 17 schools are in the Marikina Watershed areas (Source: CPDO) Continuous use of national protected areas for educational purposes 17 schools with no official site titleApplication for separation of 4 extension HS is delayed
Terrain 13 schools are in far-flung mountainous areas(Source: CPDO) Coordination with local communities in far-flung mountainous areas to improve transport of services Difficulty in access by 3,554 students (2.37%) and 112 teachersMonitoring by division/region/national personnel on academic performance and resource management is affected

 

 

 

 

 

Economic Factor These include aspects that influence business or an investment’s value which directly affects the quality of education in the city.

 

Economic Factors

Data

Opportunities

Threats

Poverty Poverty threshold for 2009 is 3.6%(Source: NSCB) 274 pupils and students who are 4Ps recipients in 12 schools More students transferring from private to public schools(19% of transferees-in)
Unemployment Unemployment rate is 9.9%(Source: PESO) LGUs conduct job fairs, job placement services and work-for-pay program Students are forced to early employment (12% of total dropouts)
Economic activity Commercial and service centers, agricultural, and industrial are major economic activities(Source: LGPMS) 34.25% of city’s revenue came for 9,182 commercial and service centers that require at least high school graduates 76% retention rate in tertiary education(CHEd, 2010)

 

 

Technological Factor These include aspects that influence the operation of schools and the Division in relation to equipment and other innovations.

 

Technological Factors

Data

Opportunities

Threats

Availability of computer units and internet 368 computer units donated by LGUs, NGAs and NGOs with 26 units connected to the internet(Source: EBEIS) Increased access and capability in the use of CAIs Security, maintenance and safekeeping of equipment
Trainings on ICT PREDAC provides training through Project EXCITE(1,764 teachers trained in 36 batches Teachers apply IT knowledge in teaching and related works Monitoring of the impact and sustainability of the training

 

 

 

B.    Internal Assessment. Similar to external assessment, the internal conditions of the Division also need to be examined to determine where the strengths and weaknesses lie within the unit. It will reflect on how efficient resources are utilized to address the needs of the learners and what else can be done to improve education outcomes.

 

Level 1: PERFORMANCE OUTPUTS AND OUTCOMES (OR PERFORMANCE INDICATORS)

Strengths

Weaknesses

Extensive review sessions to participant to produce winners in regional, national and international competitions

  • International level
    • IMSO (bronze medalist, 2009-2011)
    • National level
      • STEP skills (1st place, 2009)
      • Regional level
        • Journalism (1st place, 2009-2011)
        • AP skills (1st place, 2012)
        • Sports (1st place, 2012)

 

 

 

NAT results are below the 2015 EFA target

  • Elem – 52.22
  • Sec – 46.45

 

Significant number of frustration readers and academically-challenged learners

  • Elem – 14.48%
  • Sec – 20.24%

 

Reasons:

  • Not fully implemented monitoring activities and tools on providing instructional supervision
  • Intervening activities that affect required teaching-learning days (average 8% of total school days per year)
  • Reduced contact time due to multi-shift scheme (28 schools 2-shift, 12 schools 3-shift)
Increased efficiency indicators showing improved holding power to keep learners in school

  • CSR Elem – 64.72 to 81.21

Sec – 60.04 to 74.65

  • CR Elem – 64.07 to 73.33

Sec – 56.05 to 56.31

  • SLR Elem – 8.61 to 4.34

Sec – 15.68 to 9.72

Participation rates are below the EFA target with significant number of school-age children who are not in school

  • Kinder – 32.82 (4,000 5-yo)
  • Elem – 67.35 (15,000 6-11yo)
  • Sec – 47.63 (20,000 12-15yo)

 

 

Low turnout in early registration day due to weak advocacy

  • Kinder – 28%
  • Grade 1 – 58%
  • OSC/OSY – 0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Though the Division was able to produce winners in various competitions, the National Achievement Test (NAT) results are still below the EFA target for both elementary and secondary level. The significant number of frustration and non-readers may have an effect on these results. There are also thousands of school-age children who are not in school which show issues on access to education, but efficiency indicators show that the holding power to keep learners in school is improving.

 

 

Level 2:  ORGANIZATIONAL COMPETENCIES AND CAPABILITIES

 

Strengths

Weaknesses

Highly qualified division personnel and school heads

  • 47 principals (11 PhD/EdD holders)
  • 15 head teachers
  • 2 TICs

 

Division supervisors and school heads are oriented and trained on K-to-12 implementation, child-centered learning, SBM, EFA goals, and MDG

 

Lack of manpower resources

  • No ASDS position
  • Only 9 EPSs
  • Only 1 PSDS (out of 7 districts)
  • No health personnel
  • Only 5 admin aides (nat’l)
  • 32 personnel are contractual/JO

 

Division Office is temporarily housed in an elementary school

 

 

The Division is fortunate enough to have highly-qualified personnel and school heads that are well-oriented and trained on various DepEd programs. However, with 142,882 total enrolment from kinder to high school and 3,018 nationally-funded teachers, the number of support personnel is not enough to serve, assist and monitor the operation of schools.

 

 

Level 3: UTILIZATION OF RESOURCES (PEOPLE, PESOS, PHYSICAL ASSETS)

 

Strengths

Weaknesses

100% of schools have fully downloaded MOOE High teacher-pupil/student ratio (1:45 elem and 1:43 sec)22% of teachers perform ancillary servicesHigh classroom-pupil/student ratio (1:90 elem and 1:95 sec) 26 schools with no more space for expansion 

            

Being the biggest City Division in CALABARZON, the required teaching force and instructional rooms to meet the demands of increasing student population are below the standards. However, with an improved financial management practices, all schools were able to fully download MOOE to address their operating needs.

 

 

Level 4:  MANAGEMENT PROCESSES

 

Strengths

Weaknesses

Planning and budgeting process were made in consultation with concerned personnel and stakeholders with performance benchmark/ indicators used to asses service quality and cost-effectivenessEstablished general qualification standards, training needs assessment (for teachers) and performance evaluation mechanismsFunctions and responsibilities of each department/unit are well-defined Check and balance mechanisms are in place  

 

 

Does not allow flexibility as the need and opportunities change over timeNo periodic review so that corrective action can be undertaken to bring the budget into balanceLimited number of specialized teachers to fill up the identified needs of schools and limited training opportunities for non-teaching personnel Lack of coordination between department/sections 

 

Limited control over its personnel, utilization of its resources and expenses due to existing policy, i.e. principal empowerment

 

No established compensation and reward system in the Division

 

Various management processes show commendable assets that meet the required operational standards but certain issues need to be addressed to ensure effectiveness and efficiency in the delivery of education services. Most of these issues revolve around the level of participation of the people in the organization and how they interact with one another.

 

 

Level 5:  THE FOUR MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS – MARKETING, OPERATIONS, HUMAN RESOURCE, AND FINANCE

 

Strengths

Weaknesses

Socially responsible City Division that continuously provide quality education to its constituentsStrict implementation of DepEd rules in hiring and promotion of teachers and personnel Effective management of financial records to comply with the requirements for the allocation of budget Strict implementation of DBM and COA rules and DepEd orders in the disbursement of funds resulting to disallowances Limited resources on critical resources like teachers and classroomsNo specific plan for teacher and staff progression and successionNo established incentives and awards system Monitoring of performance outputs vis-a-vis utilization of funds

 

The Division has competent personnel and staff dealing with the four management functions, but an effective monitoring tool and practices is necessary to address the loopholes in the delivery of education services in terms of resources and performance evaluation.

 

 

Level 6:  PERFORMANCE LEVELS OF TEAMS AND INDIVIDUALS IN THE ORGANIZATION

 

Strengths

Weaknesses

Established system of assessing competencies of teachers and personnel (NCBTS, PMS)Qualified and competent staff and personnel Lack of manpower/ multi-tasking of personnelCommitment level of staff and personnel

 

With qualified and competent staff and personnel, the Division needs the capability to properly motivate its people to increase their level of commitment. This is essential to augment the lack of manpower resources which result to multi-tasking of teachers performing non-teaching duties and personnel handling multiple portfolios.

 

 

Level 7:  PHYSICAL FACILITIES/ SET-UP AND WORKING CONDITIONS

 

Strengths

Weaknesses

Physical structures constructed meet the minimum requirementsStability and maintenance of buildings are monitored by school and division physical facilities coordinators No electric and water facilities in 15 schools26 schools with small school site/no space for expansionAll schools have no drainage system 

 

The Division fails to provide the physical requirements to schools with small school site because there is no more space for expansion. Likewise, the provision of electrical and water supplies are also hindered by inaccessibility of schools due to its terrain and geographic location. Failure to include plans to set up a drainage system in schools is also an issue that needs to be addressed.

 

 

Level 8:  ORGANIZATIONAL AFFILIATIONS, ALLIANCES AND LINKAGES

 

Strengths

Weaknesses

43 supportive stakeholders (POs, NGOs, CSOs, church- and school-based organizations) that provides assistance to schools Lack of coordination with the Division in identifying priority schools

 

The support provided by various stakeholders and education partners are recognized during the Education Summit held annually to renew their unyielding support to the Division.

 

 

Level 9:  TOP MANAGEMENT, BOARD AND LEADERSHIP

 

Strengths

Weaknesses

Division’s VMOSPAPs to deliver basic education services were articulated and made clear to the total organizational system Appropriateness and effectiveness of the check and balance to measure the outcomes of the basic education services is not fully implemented

 

The Division Head is highly qualified and competent to lead the organization and provide the direction of what is to be achieved, but the check and balance system to measure outcomes is not fully implemented and monitored.

 

 

Level 10:  STRATEGIC FIT OR CONSISTENCY IN VISION STRATEGIES-ORGANIZATION AND PEOPLE (VSOP)

 

Strengths

Weaknesses

The vision-mission-objectives set, strategies adopted, organization’s structures, systems and resources applied and the people in the school support one another VSOPs need to be re-assessed with current trends in education (i.e. K-to-12 curriculum, ACCESs)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusions Based on Situational Analysis:

 

External Assessment (EA)

Internal Assessment

(IA)

  • There is strong linkage with education partners that needs to be sustained
  • The increasing trend in population and the physical characteristics or geographic profile of the city require greater needs for educational resources

 

  • The holding power to keep the learners in school is improving based on the trend on cohort survival, completion and school leaver rates
  • The level of access to education to capture school-age learners from kinder to high school must be improved
  • Monitoring is crucial in the successful implementation of programs, projects and activities to improve performance

 

 

 

 

III.  Targets (SY 2013-2016)

 

The Division aims to increase participation in basic education and improve the achievement level of all learners to attain the 2015 EFA targets. Partnership with our education partners shall be strengthened by recognizing their contributions during the annual Education Summit. Extensive monitoring activities shall also be enforced to ensure that programs and projects for access, efficiency and quality are appropriately implemented.

 

Indicator

Baseline

SY 11-12

Target

SY 12-13

Target

SY 13-14

Target

SY 14-15

Target

SY 15-16

Target

EFA

GER-       Kinder-       Elem-       Sec

32.82

81.79

63.35

49.62

91.34

75.01

66.41

100.90

86.68

83.21

110.45

98.34

100.00

120.00

110.00

100.00

120.00

110.00

NER-       Elem-       Sec

67.35

47.63

75.04

57.65

82.73

67.67

90.41

77.68

98.10

87.70

98.10

87.70

CSR-       Elem-       Sec

81.21

74.65

82.83

76.74

84.49

78.83

86.18

80.91

87.90

83.00

84.67

83.00

Completion-       Elem-       Sec

78.91

69.15

80.49

70.68

82.10

72.21

83.74

73.74

85.41

75.27

84.07

75.27

SLR-       Elem-       Sec

4.34

9.72

3.71

8.52

3.08

7.33

2.44

6.13

1.81

4.93

1.81

4.93

Achievement-       Elem-       Sec

52.22

46.45

60.42

53.59

68.61

60.73

76.81

67.86

85.00

75.00

85.00

75.00

 

 

 

IV. Strategies. To attain the division targets and priorities, the following strategies shall serve as the master plan to address issues on access, quality and governance. These shall form part of the Education Development Plan in harmony with the vision, mission, goals and objectives of the Division.

 

Strategies

Activities

Strengthen child-find, advocacy campaign, and alternative delivery modes to increase enrolment 1.1. Coordinate with local government units and communities to find school-age children and OSC/OSY, and encourage them to enroll in the school nearest them1.2. Develop and distribute campaign materials to ensure enrolment and attendance of learners this school year1.3. Conduct early enrolment for learners who failed to show up during the early registration day1.4. Conduct orientation and training to school heads in the implementation of alternative delivery modes1.5. Monitor the turn-out during enrolment period and opening of classes
Facilitate the acquisition of new school sites and initial operation of schools to be established 2.1. Identify possible new school sites near highly-congested schools and areas with no public school2.2. Coordinate with city government in the acquisition of new school sites2.3 Prepare the needed documents for the establishment of new schools with school heads and division personnel concerned2.4. Work with the PFC, Supply and Planning Office for the allocation of resources of new schools to be established
Train teacher-mentors to develop the instructional competence and classroom management of teachers 3.1. Scout/recruit teachers or school heads to be trained as mentors3.2. Conduct training/workshop of teacher-mentors by division supervisors3.3. Observe, monitor and evaluate the mentoring activities of mentors to teachers
Train school heads on SBM-PASBE and ACCESs 4.1. Organize division training team to train school heads on SBM-PASBE and ACCESs4.2. Conduct training of school heads on SBM-PASBE and ACCESs4.3. Observe, monitor and evaluate the implementation of SBM-PASBE and ACCESs
Intensify monitoring of instructional supervision and transformational leadership 5.1. Organize division QAA team to monitor school heads on instructional supervision and transformational leadership5.2. Conduct M&E activities on instructional supervision and transformational leadership
Recognize contributions of education partners to sustain strong linkages 6.1. Conduct annual Education Summit with all education stakeholders6.2. Issue plaques or certificates of appreciation to stakeholders with significant contributions to education

SPECIAL EDUCATION

 

SPED is a set of educational program or service specially designed to meet the needs of learners with disabilities. It has its own tools, techniques and research effort all focused on improving instructional arrangement and procedures to meet the learning needs of children with special needs. It includes individually planned and systematically monitored arrangement of physical setting, special equipments and materials, teaching procedures and giving intervention designed to help exceptional children achieve personal sufficiency and academic success.

 

Antipolo City SPED Center caters children with special needs with different disabilities:

 

  • Global development delay
  • Mental retardation
  • Down syndrome
  • Autism
  • Specific learning disability
  • Attention deficit hyperactive disorder
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Obsessive compulsive behavior
  • Hearing impairment
  • Visual impairment
  • Communication disorder
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Serious emotional disorder

 

 

 

ARABIC LANGUAGE AND ISLAMIC VALUES EDUCATION (ALIVE)

 

As per DepEd Order No. 51, s. 2007, the department is mandated to have all private madaris and public schools for Muslim offer ALIVE as part of their curriculum. Two elementary schools from the two legislative districts have been identified to be the nearest schools in communities with Muslim learners. These are Sta. Cruz Elementary School and Juan Sumulong Elementary School.

 

Trained asatidz are handling ALIVE classes for all grade levels. Sets of books are provided for the learners, and they are also evaluated periodically to determine the level of knowledge and understanding based on the standards set by DepEd.

 

 

ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEM

 

 

The 1987 Philippine Constitution provides for the recognition and promotion of other forms of education outside the formal school system. Article XIV, sec. 2, paragraph 4 concisely encourage non-formal, informal and indigenous learning systems as well as self-learning, independent, and out-of-school study programs particularly those that respond to community needs.

 

Likewise, the Government Act for Basic Education (RA 9155) also stipulates the establishment of the ALS to provide out-of-school children, youth and adult population with basic education.

 

The Division conducts classes for Basic Literacy Program (BLP), Literacy cum Livelihood Program (LCL) and Accreditation and Equivalency (A&E) review. These cover all barangays in the City including far-flung mountainous areas with Dumagat natives as one of their clientele.